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Soda Versus Our Teeth (Spoiler Alert – Teeth Lose!)

According to Statista, the soda industry made an astounding $11,834m, in 2019 alone, and this figure is estimated to grow by 1.4% every year for the foreseeable future. Although most people realize that soda can have dire consequences for their health, it has not stopped 48% of Australian adults from consuming soda daily.

What does soda do to your teeth?

Developing a soda dependency can have a multitude of serious consequences for your oral health. However, the two most significant effects are erosion and decay. Erosion refers to the loss and damage of your enamel, which is a coating on your teeth that acts as a protective barrier. When you drink soda this coating is damaged and begins to erode. Once this layer has been destroyed it is impossible to restore and your teeth will be left weak and prone to damage. 

The other serious consequence associated with soda consumption is tooth decay. Tooth decay and cavities occur when the next layer of the tooth, Dentin, becomes damaged. When left untreated cavities can result in tooth loss, as well as other serious side effects. 

While it is commonly believed that it is only the sugar in soda that causes damage to the tooth this could not be further from the truth. The carbonated water in the soda will often contain acids that cause the enamel to break down. The more acid that is present in your mouth, the higher the likelihood of damage to your teeth.

Although the best defence against tooth decay is to stop drinking soda altogether, there are a few things you can do to protect your teeth if you do indulge occasionally. The first thing you should do is drink your soda with a straw to minimize contact with your teeth. You should also avoid brushing your teeth immediately after having a soda to avoid damage from the acid in the drink and the abrasiveness of brushing.